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Alienware still has the same call centers, and many of its early employees have stuck around. We've succeeded by not being afraid to take risks," Michael Dell said in an email interview this week."The more skeptics, the greater the rewards for the risk takers." And Alienware is still considered a cool-geek brand, regularly appearing on the current hit TV show about nerd culture, "The Big Bang Theory." "They're one of the sports cars of the PC world," said Bob O'Donnell, president of Technalysis Research.So Gonzalez became a "tech guy," building PCs for friends out of his garage.Then he realized other people might want to buy them too.Alienware's effect on PCs and gaming isn't about numbers, though.It's about, as any gamer will tell you, the origin story.Now, 20 years later, Alienware is one of the most recognizable gaming PC makers in the world, thanks to innovations like computers cooled with water and laptops packed with enough tech to keep up with high-performance games.

They prayed they could sell at least 50 to 100 machines a month.

Boot magazine praised its speed and design, such as the extra fans that allowed owners to eke out even more performance.

"The Area-51 computer is a remarkable device," the magazine wrote.

Imagine it's 1996, and you just finished watching FBI Special Agent Fox Mulder break out of a Russian gulag in his search for the truth about aliens, government conspiracies and the paranormal.

Nelson Gonzalez couldn't get enough of TV shows like "The X-Files," "Star Trek," "The Outer Limits" and "Lost in Space." It was a golden age of sci-fi, accented by movies like "Independence Day" and "Mars Attacks! For Gonzalez and Aguila, the answer was summed up in one word: games. But PCs at the time weren't able to deliver the horsepower needed for fast-moving, realistic games like the flight simulators Gonzalez played.

They prayed they could sell at least 50 to 100 machines a month.Boot magazine praised its speed and design, such as the extra fans that allowed owners to eke out even more performance."The Area-51 computer is a remarkable device," the magazine wrote.Imagine it's 1996, and you just finished watching FBI Special Agent Fox Mulder break out of a Russian gulag in his search for the truth about aliens, government conspiracies and the paranormal.Nelson Gonzalez couldn't get enough of TV shows like "The X-Files," "Star Trek," "The Outer Limits" and "Lost in Space." It was a golden age of sci-fi, accented by movies like "Independence Day" and "Mars Attacks! For Gonzalez and Aguila, the answer was summed up in one word: games. But PCs at the time weren't able to deliver the horsepower needed for fast-moving, realistic games like the flight simulators Gonzalez played.People began buying Alienware computers even though it took more than a month for them to be hand built and the average price was about ,500.