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Davood Azad, a renowned Iranian musician and vocalist, melded Johann Sebastian Bach's music style and Iranian classical music.Iran's main orchestras include: National Orchestra, Tehran Symphony Orchestra and Melal Orchestra (Nations Orchestra).Even after Islam, Persian musicians did not disappear: Zaryab is often credited with being the greatest influence over Andalusian and Spanish music.The position of a particular work of music often depends on the music genre and its relationship to music theory.By the time of Khosrau II the Sassanid royal court was the host of prominent musicians such as Ramtin, Bamshad, Nakisa, Azad, Sarkash, and Barbad.Among these survived names, Barbad is remembered in much documents and has been named as remarkably high skilled.The 20th-century classical composer and pianist Kaikhosru Shapurji Sorabji was of Iranian descent.

These numbers are in accordance with Sassanid's calendar of number of days in a week, month, and year.

The academic Authentic Persian Music (Musiq-i-Asil) is strongly based on the theories of sonic aesthetics as expounded by the likes of Farabi and Shirazi in the early centuries of Islam.

It also preserves melodic formula that are often attributed to the musicians of the Persian imperial court of Khosroe Parviz in the Sassanid Period.

During the Pahlavi Dynasty from 1925 to 1979, Iran produced the Classic / Dastgahi singing stars Adib, Badie zadeh, Gholam Hossein Banan, Marzeyeh, Hoseyn Ghawami, Taj esfahani, and instrumentalists like Majid Kiani, Haj Ali Akbar khan Shahnazi, Abolhasan Saba, Asghar Bahari, Ahmad Ebadi, Hossein Tehrani, Faramarz Payvar, Ali Tadjvidi, Parviz Yahaghi, Jalil Shahnaz and Hassan Kassai.

The years after the 1979 revolution emerged Islamic Republic approved stars like Parviz Meshkatian, Kayhan Kalhor, Mohammad Reza Lotfi, Hossein Alizadeh, Dariush Talai, Mohammad-Reza Shajarian, and Shahram Nazeri. Even though the revolution era coincided with the music's popularity, music and Islam have not always meshed well, and many Iranian conservatives disliked even the simple melodies and lyrics of classical music.

These numbers are in accordance with Sassanid's calendar of number of days in a week, month, and year.

The academic Authentic Persian Music (Musiq-i-Asil) is strongly based on the theories of sonic aesthetics as expounded by the likes of Farabi and Shirazi in the early centuries of Islam.

It also preserves melodic formula that are often attributed to the musicians of the Persian imperial court of Khosroe Parviz in the Sassanid Period.

During the Pahlavi Dynasty from 1925 to 1979, Iran produced the Classic / Dastgahi singing stars Adib, Badie zadeh, Gholam Hossein Banan, Marzeyeh, Hoseyn Ghawami, Taj esfahani, and instrumentalists like Majid Kiani, Haj Ali Akbar khan Shahnazi, Abolhasan Saba, Asghar Bahari, Ahmad Ebadi, Hossein Tehrani, Faramarz Payvar, Ali Tadjvidi, Parviz Yahaghi, Jalil Shahnaz and Hassan Kassai.

The years after the 1979 revolution emerged Islamic Republic approved stars like Parviz Meshkatian, Kayhan Kalhor, Mohammad Reza Lotfi, Hossein Alizadeh, Dariush Talai, Mohammad-Reza Shajarian, and Shahram Nazeri. Even though the revolution era coincided with the music's popularity, music and Islam have not always meshed well, and many Iranian conservatives disliked even the simple melodies and lyrics of classical music.

The history of musical performance in Sassanid Iran is however better documented than earlier periods.