Sexy database swar kebal har six

02-Apr-2016 03:45

So blockchains offer a way to replace these organizations with a distributed database, locked down by clever cryptography.

Like so much that has come before, they leverage the ever-increasing capacity of computer systems to provide a new way of replacing humans with code.

And no matter how these techniques develop, they will never beat the simple and straightforward method of hiding data completely.

A second benefit of blockchain-powered databases is extreme fault tolerance, which stems from their built-in redundancy.

In other words, like most technology decisions, the choice between a blockchain and a regular database comes down to a series of trade-offs.

People need hiring, processes need to be designed, and all this takes a great deal of time and money.

This contrasts with traditional (SQL or No SQL) databases that are controlled by a single entity, even if some kind of distributed architecture is used within its walls.

I recently gave a talk about blockchains from the perspective of information security, in which I concluded that blockchains are more secure than regular databases in some ways, and less secure in others.

Four key differences between blockchains and regular databases If you’ve been reading my previous posts, you will know by now that blockchains are simply a new type of database.

That is, a database which can be directly shared, in a write sense, by a group of non-trusting parties, without requiring a central administrator.

People need hiring, processes need to be designed, and all this takes a great deal of time and money.

This contrasts with traditional (SQL or No SQL) databases that are controlled by a single entity, even if some kind of distributed architecture is used within its walls.

I recently gave a talk about blockchains from the perspective of information security, in which I concluded that blockchains are more secure than regular databases in some ways, and less secure in others.

Four key differences between blockchains and regular databases If you’ve been reading my previous posts, you will know by now that blockchains are simply a new type of database.

That is, a database which can be directly shared, in a write sense, by a group of non-trusting parties, without requiring a central administrator.

A smart contract is nothing more than a piece of computer code which runs on every node in a blockchain – a decades-old technology called stored procedures does the same for centralized databases.